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Bush plays first concert of 2020 at San Antonio Rodeo

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Bush, pictured here during a 2019 show in Los Angeles, played its first concert of 2020 on Wednesday night at the San Antonio Rodeo.

Bush, pictured here during a 2019 show in Los Angeles, played its first concert of 2020 on Wednesday night at the San Antonio Rodeo.

Photo: Scott Dudelson /Getty Images

Photo: Scott Dudelson /Getty Images

Bush, pictured here during a 2019 show in Los Angeles, played its first concert of 2020 on Wednesday night at the San Antonio Rodeo.

Bush, pictured here during a 2019 show in Los Angeles, played its first concert of 2020 on Wednesday night at the San Antonio Rodeo.

Photo: Scott Dudelson /Getty Images

Bush plays first concert of 2020 at San Antonio Rodeo

If a buddy tells you they met Gavin Rossdale at the rodeo on Wednesday night, don’t doubt them.

The Bush front man took a jaunt through the AT&T Center during the band’s concert, climbing off the stage, jogging across the dirt, scaling a railing and ascending into the stands while singing “Little Things.”

It was definitely the highlight of what was a solid but frills-free concert by the British grunge band best known for its album “Sixteen Stone,” which has been a rock radio staple for a quarter-century.

With just a drum kit and some speaker cabinets on the rotating stage at the center of the arena floor, Rossdale had plenty of room to roam even before he headed out to meet his fans.

In its first concert of 2020, Bush played some recent songs, such as “This is War” from its 2017 album “Black and White Rainbows,” and “Bullet Holes,” which was on the soundtrack to last year’s “John Wick” sequel. But the set list was stacked with hits from “Sixteen Stone” such as “Machinehead,” “Glycerine” (which Rossdale played solo) and “Everything Zen.”

After that song, Rossdale — who was clearly having fun — looked up into the stands and said, “This is like the Super Bowl.”

That’s a matter of perspective.

For some fans in the stands, watching the four black-clad musicians power through those mid-’90s hits probably was more like emerging from a time warp into Sunken Garden Theater, a hallowed space for San Antonio rockers where Bush played a couple of frenzied concerts.

When the audience took over for a chorus of the sonically expansive version of “Comedown” that closed the show, that illusion was complete.

Jim Kiest is the arts and entertainment editor for the San Antonio Express-News. Read him on our free site, mySA.com, and on our subscriber site, ExpressNews.com. | jkiest@express-news.net | Twitter: @jimik64

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